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Eric Johnson

AnacortesEric@gmail.com

Anacortes Cold Weather Shelter Opens 31 January – 3 Feb 2017

The Anacortes Cold Weather Shelter at the Salvation Army will open on Tuesday evening, 31 January through Friday morning, 3 February, 2017, as forecasted low temperatures will be at 30° F and below.

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Anacortes Cold Weather Shelter Opens: 10 – 12 January

See the updates on the Cold Weather Shelter website at https://anacortescoldweathershelter.wordpress.com

Cold Weather Shelter Procedures

Salvation Army – Anacortes Corps

General Instructions

Mission Statement: Provide a safe overnight shelter for families during extreme weather to willing people who have no place else to come in from the cold.

Shelter Hours: 5:30 PM until 7:30 AM

Our shelter will take men, women and children.

  • If no guests arrive before 6:30 PM, the shelter will not open that night.
    • If the shelter does not open, the first shift will notify the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th shift workers of the closure and lock the building.

Check In: 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

  • Name tags (preferably with first name only) should be worn by all volunteers.
  • A volunteer will be stationed at the front desk during check-in.
  • All guests must sign the Shelter Guest Agreement [See Atch].
  • No alcohol or drug use permitted on the premises.
  • If a guest is a threat to others or to him/herself call 911.

Designated Areas:

  • Guests will eat and sleep in the designated area upstairs.
  • Guests are not permitted in the kitchen or unaccompanied downstairs
  • Smoking is permitted outside at the designated area near the butt cans.

 Telephone:

  • In case of emergency, call 911.
  • Volunteers (first shift) should answer the phone at the front desk.
  • Guests may use the phone for three minutes

Weapons:

  • If guests have weapons, they must check them in with volunteers. Weapons will be labeled and locked in the safe.
  • Weapons will be returned to guest upon leaving the shelter.

Doors

  • The front door will be locked at 10 PM after the last smoke break. All guests must remain inside the building after this time.
  • Any guest leaving the building after 10 PM will not be allowed to return to the shelter that night.

Beverages

  • Coffee, tea, hot water, etc., will be available at all times.

Smoking

  • Smoking is permitted outside the building near the butt can. All cigarette butts are to be placed in the receptacle. Guests may go outside to smoke until 9:45 PM

Personal Belongings

  • Guests’ belongings may be left in the building during the next day if it is known that the shelter will be open the following evening.

Fire Extinguishers

  • Locate and memorize each fire extinguisher location.

 

 

1st Shift – 5:00 – 7:30PM

3 volunteers

 5:00 PM

  • Salvation Army staff will open the building, turn heat on and turn on the outdoor marquee.
  • Upon volunteers arrival
    • Personal belongings should be kept in the office
    • Put on a name badge
    • Sign-in on the Shift Report at the check-in desk
    • Set up check-in desk with:
      • Shelter guest agreements
      • Shelter guest log
      • Shelter shift report
    • Set up supply area with:
      • Floor mats
      • Blanket and sleeping bag bins
    • Start coffee and hot water, set out food supplies

 

5:30 – 7:30 PM

  • If no guests arrive by 6:30 PM, the shelter will not open that night. The first shift will notify 2nd and 3rd shift workers of the closure and lock the building.
  • Greet guests and hand out blankets and mats. Large garbage bags can be used for wet clothes, coats, etc., Label bags with guest’s name. (There may be an area to hang wet coats.)
  • Have all guests read (or read it out loud) and sign the Shelter Guest Agreement.
    • Fill out the shelter log for each person.
  • Guests do not need to provide ID
  • Ask about any weapons and lock them in the safe.
  • Volunteers may not give money to any shelter guests.
  • Show guests the restrooms, sleeping and eating areas.
  • Answer the phone if it rings.
  • Begin serving dinner at 7:00 PM
  • Make notes in the Shelter Shift Report for needed supplies, disturbances, etc. Log any activities that appear odd.
  • If you need to clean up any areas, use latex/rubber gloves and bleach water. (Use 1 tsp bleach to 1 gal of water.)
  • Notify next shift of any weapons in the kitchen.

 

7:00 PM Supper

  • Give any announcement to reinforce the rules
  • Offer a prayer to ask a blessing on the food and guests.

 

7:30 PM

  • Fill out the Shelter Shift Report if new staff are coming in

 

2nd Shift: 7:30PM – 10:00 PM

2 volunteers

Second Shift is responsible for:

  • Read and sign-in on the Shelter Shift Report, put on name badge and check-in with the 1st Shift Volunteers
  • Answer the phone
  • Volunteers may not give money to any shelter guests
  • Clean-up dishes, wipe tables, etc., after supper. Guests may want to help, but cannot, due to health regulations
  • If you need to clean up any areas, use latex/rubber gloves and bleach water. (Use 1 tsp bleach to 1 gal of water.)
  • 7:30 PM – 8:00 PM: Clothing Closet
    • Volunteers doe not need to open the clothing closet if staffing is inadequate
  • 10:00 PM: Lights out and lock the building
    • After the building is locked, guests are not to leave the building and will not be allowed back in
    • Volunteers may use their own discretion to permit late arrivals to stay at the shelter
    • Make notes in the Shelter Shift Report for needed supplied, disturbances, etc. Factually log any activities that seem odd.

 

3rd & 4th Shift: 10:00 PM – 2:00 AM and 2:00 AM – 6:00 AM

2 volunteers each

 Third Shift is responsible for:

  • Read and sign-in on the Shelter Shift Report, put on name badge and check-in with the 2nd Shift Volunteers
  • Answer the phone
  • Volunteers may not give money to any shelter guests
  • Ensure that the doors are locked.
  • 10:00 – 6:00 PM
    • Sign out any guests who need to leave the shelter
    • One volunteer needs to be awake at ALL times; take turns sleeping.
    • Lights out at 10:00 PM. No smoking after lights out.
  • 5:00 AM – 6:00 AM
    • Set up tables and chairs for breakfast.
    • Unlock the front door.
    • Make notes in the Shelter Shift Report for needed supplied, disturbances, etc. Factually log any activities that seem odd.
    • If you need to clean up any areas, use latex/rubber gloves and bleach water. (Use 1 tsp bleach to 1 gal of water.)

 

5th Shift: 6:00 AM  – 8:00 AM

2 volunteers

 6:00 AM:

  • Read and sign-in on the Shelter Shift Report, put on name badge and check-in with the 3rd Shift Volunteers
  • Start fresh coffee
  • Answer the phone
  • Volunteers may not give money to the shelter guests

 

6:00 AM – 7:30 AM

  • Start breakfast for 7 AM eating time
  • Awaken guests at 6:45 AM
  • Serve breakfast and clean kitchen

 

7:30 AM

  • Check Out
    • Help guests pack their possessions, blankets and mat in large plastic bags if the shelter will be open the next night.
      • Possessions left in the shelter will be disposed of when the cold weather event ends.
      • Any weapons left at the shelter will be taken to the Anacortes Police station.
    • Sign out each person on the Shelter Guest Log

Clean Up

  • Clean up areas, using latex/rubber gloves and bleach water. (Use 1 tsp bleach to 1 gal of water.)
  • Bathroom cleaning supplies are located in ______
  • Store all supplies and non-perishable food in the plastic bins.
  • Straighten tables and chairs
  • Place Shelter Guest Log and Shift Reports (note supplies needed) in the three-ring binder at the front desk.
  • Ensure that all water faucets are turned off in the bathrooms and kitchen
  • Secure building: lock doors, etc.

 


Shelter Guest Agreement

PRINT NAME: __________________________________

☐ Adult      ☐ Child

Age: _____

  • I will not use alcohol or drugs while a guest on this property or I will be asked to leave. If I am asked to leave I will do so promptly.
  • I will smoke only in the designated area outside the building.
  • After 10:00 PM, I will not be allowed to leave the building until 6:30 AM.
  • If I have a weapon, I will check it with a Shelter Volunteer, who will return it upon my departure in the morning.
  • I will respect the rights of all others while using this facility.
  • I will remain in the area designated by Shelter Volunteers.
  • I understand that if I leave this shelter after 10 PM, I will not be allowed to return until the following day.

 

If someone asks if you are at the Shelter, is it OK to tell him/her that you are here?

☐ Yes      ☐ No

 

 

Signature: _______________________________________

 

Date/Time IN Volunteer Initials Date/Time OUT Volunteer Initials
       
       
       
       

 

Family members also at the Shelter: _________________________________

 For Volunteers:

  • It is very important that each guest be signed in and out
  • Guests do not need to provide ID
  • Sign in and sign out information for each stay should be on the same line
  • Use a new form when one is filled out. Do not use the back of the form.

 

 


Shelter Guest Log                                                                                       Date: ________

 

Name:

  1. _________________________________________________
  2. _________________________________________________
  3. _________________________________________________
  4. _________________________________________________
  5. _________________________________________________
  6. _________________________________________________
  7. _________________________________________________
  8. _________________________________________________
  9. _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________
  • _________________________________________________

 

 


Shelter Shift Report                                                                                   Date_______

 

  1st Shift 2nd Shift 3rd Shift 4th Shift 5th Shift
Volunteer 1          
Volunteer 2          
Volunteer 3          

 

Did any volunteers not arrive? __________________________________________

Is there a message for the scheduler? ____________________________________

How many guests attended the Shelter? _________________________________

Are there any weapons locked in the office or not claimed at checkout?

☐ Yes      ☐ No

Note needed supplies: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Log any activities that seemed odd:

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Questions and Suggestions:

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Place shift report in the Binder when the Shelter closes.

From Fr. Dale: 30 Tons of Supplies

from his Facebook post:  (20) Dale Johnson – Inspecting an estimated 30 tons of supplies for….

Warehouse

15 September: Dohuk and thence to Diyarbakir

“There are 800,000 refugees in Dohuk,” Hani Andrews, a UNHCR officer told us, “and last year half of their tents blew down during a massive windstorm.”

But big tent cities are not the only place that refugees are housed. Every possible cubby hole in Dohuk has its share of refugees: in an abandoned shopping mall, in wedding halls, in school dormitories and in other buildings scattered around the city and its suburbs.

We visited one of those sites, a wedding/reception center of the Assyrian

Walls of Boxes
Walls of Boxes

Church of the East that houses three floors of refugees, with each family living behind a stack of boxes that separates them from the other.

As an aside, one of our group of pilgrims to Irag, Greg Rhodes, a very competent photographer, has been posting pictures on Facebook over the past week. You’ll find a link to his Facebook Page in the Links: Traveling Team Facebook Updates page of this website. Continue reading “15 September: Dohuk and thence to Diyarbakir”

14 Sep 2014: Dohuk, Kurdistan, Iraq

“Welcome to Kurdistan!” our driver said with pride as we crossed the border, a procedure requiring seven different checkpoints, two changes of transport, and a heavy coating of diesel fumes in the 102° heat.

Dohuk Camp
Dohuk Camp

En route to Dohuk we passed a UNHCR refugee camp set aside specifically for Yazidis, with a population of 30,000 living in a massive tent city.

Deir Abuna Our first stop, was hard by the camp, at the town of Deir Abuna—”the Monastery of the Fathers.”

Eighty of this village’s 200 houses had been abandoned a few years ago when the PKK went on a rampage against Christians during the cross-border Turkish incursion. Now these homes are filled with Christian and Yazidi refugees, thanks to the heroic offer of the town’s mayor, Mochtar Zecharia.

Continue reading “14 Sep 2014: Dohuk, Kurdistan, Iraq”

Dohuk, Kurdistan, Iraq

We crossed the Turkish Iraq border with only 7 stops and 3 changes of vehicles and arrived in Dohuk with little difficulties.

The Flag of Kurdistan
The Flag of Kurdistan

At least five miles of trucks were lined up on the Turkish side of the border, held up by a thorough border inspection by the Turks…just another harassment of the
Kurds by the Turks.

We have been going at full speed ever since, with little time and internet connectivity to post on this blog. We’ve visited a number of refugee camps and non-profit agencies and we’re out the door again in 15 minutes.

We’re hoping to return to the border by 2:00PM in order to be in Diyarbakir tonight, after which I’ll try to process and capture what I’ve heard and seen.

Fr. Dale - Rock Star
Fr. Dale – Rock Star

In the meantime, it’s great to be traveling with a rock star.  Fr Dale is a big attraction to all the Christian refugee kids. All he has to offer is a blessing, which is exactly what they want.

Sunday: Lots of Church & Planning to Cross the Border on Monday

Border Crossing. The Turkish government has put a curfew (as of Sunday night) on border crossings, but, thus far it seems that the border is clear.

Bishop Daoud in Iraq has arranged for a driver and a van with all the necessary paperwork to carry us into that country, and we’ll have some additional escort as well.  More to follow about the border crossing on Monday night.

Church. Morning Prayer started at 5:30, Eucharist started at 6:00AM and lasted until 8AM, and then we witnessed a baptism at 10:30 that lasted another hour.  That’s a lot a church in one day.

We visited some churches that may not survive the next 10 years, as well as some local Syriac Christian families that don’t see a great future for Christians in Iraq.

Continue reading “Sunday: Lots of Church & Planning to Cross the Border on Monday”

On the Silk Road

The Tur Abdin Region. In the hilly country of eastern Turkey, the Silk Road passes nearby a number of Syriac monasteries. And it was to three of these monasteries we went to on Saturday.  The first we visited was to check in with the Metropolitan of the Tur Abdin region of

The Silk Road - with the ever present dust storm that's been here since we arrived
The Silk Road – with the ever present dust storm that’s been here since we arrived

Turkey, Bishop Samuel Akatas, who is also helping to make arrangements for our transportation across the border. We also visited monastery Mor Augin, the oldest monastery in the Syriac Orthodox church, which has been and will continue to be Fr. Dale’s current home.

The region we’re in now known as Tur Abdin, Syriac for “Mountain of the Church of God.” This mountain range of barren hills was the home of hundreds of monasteries. Now only five remain.

A brief pause for a three-paragraph history of the Syriac Orthodox Church. Suriani Christians (those who follow the Syriac Orthodox faith) speak Aramaic, the language of Jesus.  The Syrian Orthodox church broke off from the Greek Orthodox faith early in the third century, but it traces its origins to the church founded in Antioch in 37A.D., where church members were first called Christians.
Continue reading “On the Silk Road”

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